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Posts tagged ‘American Civil War Reenactment’

Returning to Rising Sun, Civil War Reenactment

Trailer  . . .

October 4, 2014

About a mile south of the Mason-Dixon Line, the historical boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania, the town of Rising Sun rests in the quiet farmland of Cecil County.¬†According to the town’s Facebook page:

The Missouri Compromise of 1820 created the political conditions which made the Mason-Dixon Line important to the history of slavery. It was during the Congressional debates leading up to the compromise that the term “Mason-Dixon line” was first used to designate the entire boundary between free states and slave states.

No Civil War battles were fought in Cecil County, but Frederick Douglass, on his escape from slavery, passed through Perryville, about ten miles south of Rising Sun, and then continuing by train to Delaware.

The Rising Sun Historic Preservation Commission sponsored the Annual Rising Sun Civil War Re-enactment, in partnership with Company A 37th Regiment, North Carolina Volunteer Troops. Over 500 local school children visited the encampment to view the demonstrations. The historical reenactors set up vignettes inside and outside their tents with artifacts and antiques from the time period. Danea Selby portrayed Catherine Virginia O’Connell, sharing her family history and homeopathic treatments.

Dr. Theodore Tate’s display included surgical instruments and medical supplies from the time period.

The Preservation Commission treated the reenactors to a full-course dinner on Saturday night. Both reenactors and guests danced at the Civil War Ball, held on the moonlit night. Music by Kaydence, featured traditional folk music with instrumentation that included guitar, concertina, flute, fiddle, mandola, banjo, and penny whistle. Tom and Lesley Mack, who called the dances, represented the Shenandoah Valley Civil War Era Dancers. A quote from their Facebook page says it best,

a dance was a chance for everyone to be cheerful in order to forget the raging war even for a few hours. It was a place to meet neighbors, friends, or newcomers and enjoy the music and dance of the time.


Near the end of the evening, reenactors fired the cannon one last time.

Experiment still frame 0477

Participants

Confederate
9th Virginia Cavalry, Company B
37th Regiment, North Carolina Volunteer Troops, Company A
1st Regiment, North Carolina Artillery, Battery C
1st Regiment, Maryland Infantry, Company 1
5th Regiment, Virginia Volunteer Infantry
2nd Corps Field Hospital
Lt Col Robert Archer Camp, Sons of Confederate Veterans

Union
2nd Delaware Volunteer Infantry, Company G
42nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Company B
Federal Generals Corps & Staff
Sedgwick VI Corps, U.S. Army

 

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